Saturday, December 22, 2007

Outlook Send/Receive Progress - Receiving reported error 0x800CCC90


OUTLOOK can not Received email from Web Hosting
error Message:
Task 'marketing - Receiving' reported error (0x800CCC90): 'Your incoming (POP3) e-mail server has reported an internal error. If you continue to receive this message, contact your server administrator or Internet service provider (ISP). The server responded:'

Solution: Here is the some of the solution from Microsoft- http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=820669

Friday, December 14, 2007

Setting a TMNET SMTP in email client

SETTING UP EMAIL CLIENT FOR SMTP PROXY OR USING PORT 587

Outlook express

1. Start Outlook Express, click the Tools menu at the top of the window and then click Accounts.

2. When the Internet Accounts window opens click on the Mail tab .Click on mail properties

3. Click on the servers tab as below. Type smtp-proxy.tm.net.my as outgoing mail.

4. In the Outgoing Mail Server window unchecked My server requires authentication.

5. Click Apply, then click OK. Close the Internet Accounts window.

6. Another alternative is to use port 587 for those who wish to maintain using their own mail server. It may or may not be turned on. You'll need to check with the administrator or hosting service whether they has turned on and support port 587.

7. To configure port 587 at outlook express, click on the Advance tab as below and put port 587 for Outgoing mail (SMTP). Click Apply, then click OK.

Microsoft outlook 2003

1. Open Microsoft Outlook and and go to Tools - Email Accounts…

2. Click the View or Change existing email accounts option, and click Next.

3. Highlight the type of email accounts you already have configured for Microsoft Outlook

4. Click the Change button. The Internet Email Settings dialog box appears, showing the settings for your existing account. Click the More Settings button.

5. The next Internet Email Settings dialog box appears containing four tabs. Click the Outgoing Server tab. Set outgoing server as smtp-proxy.tm.net.my

6. Unchecked the checkbox for My outgoing server (SMTP) requires authentication.

7. Click OK, then Next, then Finish.

8. Another alternative is to use port 587 for those who wish to maintain using their own mail server. It may or may not be turned on. You'll need to check with the administrator or hosting service whether they has turned on and support port 587.

9. To configure port 587 at Microsoft outlook 2003, click More Settings (refer above). Click on the Advance tab as below and put port 587 for Outgoing mail (SMTP). Click Apply, then click OK.

Microsoft outlook 2000

1. Start Outlook 2000 then proceed to Tools > Internet Accounts. In the Internet Accounts window, click on your streamyx/ tm.net.my' account under the Mail tab then select Properties.

2. Select the Servers tab. On this tab make sure the entry for the Outgoing Mail Server is set to smtp-proxy.tm.net.my and that the My server requires authentication box is unchecked

3. Click Apply, then click OK. Close the Internet Accounts window

4. Another alternative is to use port 587 for those who wish to maintain using their own mail server. It may or may not be turned on. You'll need to check with the administrator or hosting service whether they has turned on and support port 587.

5. To configure port 587 at Microsoft outlook 2000, click on the Advance tab as below and put port 587 for Outgoing mail (SMTP). Click Apply, then click OK.

Mozilla Thunderbird

1. Open Thunderbird Mail. From the Tools menu select Account Settings.

2. At the left pane, select the entry Outgoing Server (SMTP). The Outgoing Server (SMTP) Settings appear on the right.

3. Edit to modify the entry of SMTP server as smtp-proxy.tm.net.my

4. In the User Name box enter your email address.

5. Click the OK button.

6. Another alternative is to use port 587 for those who wish to maintain using their own mail server. It may or may not be turned on. You'll need to check with the administrator or hosting service whether they has turned on and support port 587.

7. To configure port 587 at Mozilla Thunderbird, change the Port: (refer above) from port 25 to port 587. Click OK.

Eudora

1. Open Eudora. From the Tools menu, choose Options.

2. Choose Getting Started from the Category list.

3. In the SMTP Server (Outgoing) field, type smtp-proxy.tm.net.my

5. Uncheck the box next to Allow authentication.

6. Click the OK button.

7. Upon sending an email message, a box will appear prompting for the password to send email.

8. Another alternative is to use port 587 for those who wish to maintain using their own mail server. It may or may not be turned on. You'll need to check with the administrator or hosting service whether they has turned on and support port 587.

9. To configure port 587 at Eudora, Open Eudora and create a new message.

10. Paste the following string into the message: x-eudora-option:SMTPPort=587

11. Hit enter and the string should turn into a link then hold the "Alt" key and click the link and click "OK" in the pop-up window.

MAC OS X Mail

  1. With Mac OS X Mail Client open, from the Mail menu, select Preferences
  2. Select the Accounts option at the top of Preferences
  3. Click the Plus (+) sign at the bottom of the screen
  4. Click on the Account Information tab at the top and enter the following information:
  • Account Type: POP
  • Description: Email
  • E-Mail Address: Your preferred domain email
  • Full Name: Your full name
  • Incoming Mail Server: Your domain pop server
  • User Name: Your Emailadd
  • Password: Your password
  • SMTP Server: smtp-proxy.tm.net.my

5. Another alternative is to use port 587 for those who wish to maintain using their own mail server. It may or may not be turned on. You'll need to check with the administrator or hosting service whether they has turned on and support port 587.

6. To configure port 587 at MAC OS X Mail, put port 587 at theServer Port: as below. Click OK.




TMNET block all the Web Hosting SMTP

Mitigating Spam in TM Network
Please take note that with effect from 3rd December 2007, TMNET has blocked outbound Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) traffic or port 25 for all out going e-mails from dynamic IP addresses. Only Outbound SMTP traffic from smtp.streamyx.com and smtp.tm.net.my will be allowed.

For those who are using streamyx line (dynamic ip) that are having problems sending out email via Outlook or any mail client software, please refer to http://webknow.entertop.net/2007/12/setting-tmnet-smtp-in-email-client.html change accordingly.




Telekom Malaysia Berhad wishes to inform its customers about TM's initiative in combating spam in its Internet Protocol (IP) network to improve our quality of service.



Recently, many anti-spam organizations have blacklisted a large number of IP addresses from TM’s network. Due to this many customers have been unable to send emails from their mail server to companies who might be using database from the abovementioned anti-spam organizations.



These spamming activities by a small group have affected a large number of our customers, regardless of the nature of their Internet usage. .



Therefore, TM is taking immediate action to address this issue. Effective 3 December 2007, TM will block OUTBOUND Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) traffic or port 25 for all out going e-mails from dynamic IP addresses. Only Outbound SMTP traffic from smtp.streamyx.com and smtp.tm.net.my will be allowed.



With this implementation, Streamyx customers who have their own mail server will not be able to send e-mails. As an alternative, TM is providing an open relay server for these customers who use dynamic IP addresses. Kindly refer to http://webmail.tm.net.my/info/proxy.html on how to configure your email client in order toutilize this relay server. Alternatively, your e-mail administrators can refer to http://webmail.tm.net.my/info/smtp-proxy.html as a guide to configure your company’s email servers.


Please be assured that TM is proactively taking all possible measures to ensure that these spamming activities do not reoccur in the future. We seek your kind co-operation to implement the necessary security measures to protect your computers that are connected to the Internet from any e-mail abuse, virus infection, spyware and malicious code.


For further enquiries and assistance, email us at help@tm.com.my or call TM at 100 and select ‘Internet Services’.


source from TM

Saturday, December 1, 2007

A New Approach to Web Applications - Ajax (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML)

Defining Ajax

Ajax isn’t a technology. It’s really several technologies, each flourishing in its own right, coming together in powerful new ways. Ajax incorporates:

Ajax Q&A

March 13, 2005: Since we first published Jesse’s essay, we’ve received an enormous amount of correspondence from readers with questions about Ajax. In this Q&A, Jesse responds to some of the most common queries.

Q. Did Adaptive Path invent Ajax? Did Google? Did Adaptive Path help build Google’s Ajax applications?

A. Neither Adaptive Path nor Google invented Ajax. Google’s recent products are simply the highest-profile examples of Ajax applications. Adaptive Path was not involved in the development of Google’s Ajax applications, but we have been doing Ajax work for some of our other clients.

Q. Is Adaptive Path selling Ajax components or trademarking the name? Where can I download it?

A. Ajax isn’t something you can download. It’s an approach — a way of thinking about the architecture of web applications using certain technologies. Neither the Ajax name nor the approach are proprietary to Adaptive Path.

Q. Is Ajax just another name for XMLHttpRequest?

A. No. XMLHttpRequest is only part of the Ajax equation. XMLHttpRequest is the technical component that makes the asynchronous server communication possible; Ajax is our name for the overall approach described in the article, which relies not only on XMLHttpRequest, but on CSS, DOM, and other technologies.

Q. Why did you feel the need to give this a name?

A. I needed something shorter than “Asynchronous JavaScript+CSS+DOM+XMLHttpRequest” to use when discussing this approach with clients.

Q. Techniques for asynchronous server communication have been around for years. What makes Ajax a “new” approach?

A. What’s new is the prominent use of these techniques in real-world applications to change the fundamental interaction model of the Web. Ajax is taking hold now because these technologies and the industry’s understanding of how to deploy them most effectively have taken time to develop.

Q. Is Ajax a technology platform or is it an architectural style?

A. It’s both. Ajax is a set of technologies being used together in a particular way.

Q. What kinds of applications is Ajax best suited for?

A. We don’t know yet. Because this is a relatively new approach, our understanding of where Ajax can best be applied is still in its infancy. Sometimes the traditional web application model is the most appropriate solution to a problem.

Q. Does this mean Adaptive Path is anti-Flash?

A. Not at all. Macromedia is an Adaptive Path client, and we’ve long been supporters of Flash technology. As Ajax matures, we expect that sometimes Ajax will be the better solution to a particular problem, and sometimes Flash will be the better solution. We’re also interested in exploring ways the technologies can be mixed (as in the case of Flickr, which uses both).

Q. Does Ajax have significant accessibility or browser compatibility limitations? Do Ajax applications break the back button? Is Ajax compatible with REST? Are there security considerations with Ajax development? Can Ajax applications be made to work for users who have JavaScript turned off?

A. The answer to all of these questions is “maybe”. Many developers are already working on ways to address these concerns. We think there’s more work to be done to determine all the limitations of Ajax, and we expect the Ajax development community to uncover more issues like these along the way.

Q. Some of the Google examples you cite don’t use XML at all. Do I have to use XML and/or XSLT in an Ajax application?

A. No. XML is the most fully-developed means of getting data in and out of an Ajax client, but there’s no reason you couldn’t accomplish the same effects using a technology like JavaScript Object Notation or any similar means of structuring data for interchange.

Q. Are Ajax applications easier to develop than traditional web applications?

A. Not necessarily. Ajax applications inevitably involve running complex JavaScript code on the client. Making that complex code efficient and bug-free is not a task to be taken lightly, and better development tools and frameworks will be needed to help us meet that challenge.

Q. Do Ajax applications always deliver a better experience than traditional web applications?

A. Not necessarily. Ajax gives interaction designers more flexibility. However, the more power we have, the more caution we must use in exercising it. We must be careful to use Ajax to enhance the user experience of our applications, not degrade it.

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